Powerful image highlights skin cancer risks

June 7, 2010

Changemyface worked with the ECB and SK:N clinics to show the dangers of too much sun – I think this works really well…here’s the coverage in today’s Telegraph…

Graeme Swann: One test I can’t afford to miss

England cricketer Graeme Swann discovered a suspiscous mole as he underwent tests to highlight a new campaign to raise awareness of skin cancer.

By Victoria Lambert
Published: 7:00AM BST 07 Jun 2010

Cricketers Matt Prior, Andrew Strauss and Graeme Swann illustrate   the dangers of sun damage

Cricketers Matt Prior, Andrew Strauss and Graeme Swann illustrate the dangers of sun damage

England cricketer Graeme Swann doesn’t think about sunscreen much. He’s not interested in sunbathing, and admits to just slapping cream on without consulting the bottle: “I don’t really know which brand or factor – it tends to be whatever is handy,” he says.

Were it not for the day job, he might avoid the sun. But Swann, 31, is ECB Cricketer of the Year and already a hero to fans: he is the first English off-spinner since Jim Laker to take 10 wickets in a match, when England beat their hosts Bangladesh in the first Test of the series.

Swann cannot dismiss the need for protection: cricketers, with their long hours in the field, are at particular risk of skin cancer. A study has found that one in seven county players had to be referred to specialists after the discovery of potential melanomas during check-ups. Now the Professional Cricketer’s Association has organised screening for all its members at private clinics nationwide run by the dermatology specialists sk:n. Of those screened so far, 15 per cent have been told they need further checks.

The consequences of ignoring the problem were confirmed recently when Mark Jasper, 41, the Australian-born cricketer who plays in Devon, revealed that he was terminally ill after being diagnosed with skin cancer. This was contracted, he believes, after he failed to apply sunscreen during a match in New Zealand in 2001 and was badly burnt.

The rate of skin cancer in men is on the rise. Last week, figures from Cancer Research UK showed that the number of men dying from malignant melanoma had almost trebled over the past three decades. In the late Seventies, fewer than 400 men died from melanoma; now it is more than 1,100.

Skin cancer is the second most common form of the disease in young adults, with nearly 200 cases reported in Britain daily. Yet it is preventable if people avoid sunburn and deal with “worrying” moles early, the charity says.

www.changemyface.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: