Last week I was honoured to be asked to talk to the Medical Artists’ Association www.maa.org.uk at the Royal College of Surgeons. Here is a summary part 1. of the Art of Age Progression….

I found this definition of ageing on wikipedia……Ageing is the accumulation of changes in an organism or object over time. Aging in humans refers to a multidimensional process of physical, psychological, and social change. Some dimensions of aging grow and expand over time, while others decline.

I studied illustration and photography at Maidstone Art college and after a few years, joined the Missing People Charity where I learnt all the different skills to become a forensic artist. This included training at the FBI Academy in Quantico in 2D and 3D facial reconstruction  – witness interviewing and E-Fit training at Durham with the British Police, Age Progression training at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Washington. And last but not least – the Medical Art Post graduate course.

Here are some of the images I produced – I tried to incorporate the forensic art into my Medical Art course as this was my line of work at the time. From 1997 to 2004 I worked for the Missing People Charity – I started as a volunteer then moved into case work, looking after the families of those who had gone missing. I then moved into the Identification department and started to learn forensic art, which included child age progression for long term missing children, facial reconstruction from skeletal remains, sanitizing photos of people found dead and updating photos of missing adults, i.e. changing hairstyles etc I also helped police to match missing persons reports with those found unidentified, dead or alive.

Age progressions are normally done for three reasons……

Firstly and most importantly, they are used when someone has been missing for two or more years and there has been sufficient time for appearances to change. The age progression image normally renews publicity and media interest in a case, therefore the case stays pro-active, supporting families and hopefully finding the person safe.

Secondly, age progressions are produced by or for police to try to capture criminals.

Thirdly, age progressions are often used in the media to illustrate to people the damaging effects of for example, smoking, drinking and sunbathing as a kind of a shock tactic.

Missing Person April Fabb

This is the case of missing person April Fabb – she was 13 when she disappeared on her bicycle in Norfolk, never to be seen again. She would now be in her mid 50’s.

Here I started off with a reference photograph in colour of a lady in her 50’s. I then used that as my main reference photo. I had pictures of her parents in their 50’s and used those as reference, Each age progression is different, and sometimes I’ll merge the missing photo with that of a family member. It just depends on what I have to work with.

Effectively, you are piecing together a puzzle using reference pictures of family members – here lie the clues as to how someone is going to look when they are older. Ultimately, I’m always hopeful that I’ll maintain the proportions and ‘unique look’ of that person.

Part 2 continues later…..

www.changemyface.com

www.missingpeople.org.uk

Katie Price Vice: Katie Price has Botox every six months

Katie Price, model, entrepreneur and author, 31, reveals her fitness and beauty regime and why you can’t beat the needle:

SKIN

Looking after my skin is not my strong point but the two things that do make my skin look better are sunbeds and Botox.

I used to use spray tan but it stinks so now I use sun beds. I know people say they’re dangerous and can give you skin cancer but I don’t smoke, I hardly drink and we’ve all got to die of something, so that’s just my choice.

I get my forehead and around my eyes Botoxed every six months and I love it. You can’t beat it.

It just freezes all the wrinkles and that’s what you want but I’d never have a full face lift, I’ve seen what they can do to people and I don’t want to go through that.

I do get the odd spot and I’ve got a few at the moment but that’s down to stress.

MAKE UP

I don’t wear any make-up if I’m not working but if I’m doing a shoot, going out or appearing on TV I’m like a drag queen.

I like lots and lots of products; in fact I like the whole of the Boots counter. I wear Dior Showgirl mascara, lipstick by Bourjois, Mac or Stila, and Mac eyeliner and eye shadow. I’m also a big fan of false lashes and I love Mac again.

I get facials every week – Alexandra House near my house are great – but I like to go to different places every week to hide from the paparazzi.

And however big a night I’ve had I always take my make-up off before I go to bed.

Whenever I’m in the car on the way home I’ve always got my pyjamas, my blanket and my make up remover and I always take it off on the way home.

www.changemyface.com

An image has been created of Anne Frank to show how she would look on her 80th birthday. I feel the image is not entirely up to date – she looks like an elderly woman from the 1950’s. However, to be fair, the image is sympathetically constructed…

anne frank

The ‘age progression’ image shows the diarist as she might have appeared today had she not died of typhus and starvation at the age of 15 in Bergen Belsen in March 1945, just a few weeks before the Nazi concentration camp was liberated by British troops.

Created for the Anne Frank Trust UK to mark her birthday on Friday – using the same techniques developed to artificially age missing people such as toddler Madeleine McCann – it is hoped the picture will help inspire Britain’s school children to think about the kind of lives they would like to lead, and to remember the loss of six million people in the Holocaust.

The Trust will launch a competition for children to write a letter to their 80-year-old selves, one of a number of projects being run across the world to mark the anniversary and challenge racist attitudes.

Anne’s half-sister Eva Schloss, a survivor of Auschwitz who played with her as a child in Amsterdam, saw the aged image for the first time on Thursday.

“I must say I was a bit shocked… I don’t really know why,” she said.

“It is a beautiful lady, very gentle, very kind-looking with this gentle smile.”

The aged image was produced by a Michigan firm called Phojoe which has worked with US police on dozens of missing persons cases.

The firm describes the technique as “part art, part science and a little intuition”, and bases its aged image on whatever photographs are available – which in Anne Franks’ case were of a carefree young girl.

Dr Schloss believes the loss of her mother and sister and Anne’s experiences in Auschwitz and then Bergen Belsen would have left their mark if she had lived, however.

“Personally I think she would have been more bitter and disappointed. I don’t see anything of this in the picture.”

Anne’s diary, which was first published in Dutch in 1947 and has since been translated into more than 60 different languages, details her time hiding from the Nazis with her Jewish family in Amsterdam.

Link to Telegraph article

changemyface – age progression, cosmetic surgery imaging and slimmer imaging

We’re always interested in the ageing process and how much of it is determined by genes and how much is determined by environmental factors. This study looking at identical twins confirms that external factors significantly contribute to the ageing process. We found this article in Aesthetic Medicine Magazine:

twinstudy1

A new study involving identical twins has suggested that despite genetic make-up, certain environmental factors, such as the use of antidepressants, can add years to a person’s perceived age.

Results published on the web version of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), show that factors such as divorce or the use of antidepressants can be significantly ageing.

Dr Bahaman Guyuron, ASPS member surgeon and study author, professor and chairman, department of plastic surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, said, “In this study, we looked at identical twins because they are genetically programmed to age exactly the same, and in doing so we essentially discovered that, when it comes to your face, it is possible to cheat your biological clock.”

During the study, Guyuron and colleagues obtained comprehensive questionnaires and digital images from 186 pairs of identical twins. The images were reviewed by an independent panel, who then recorded the perceived age difference between the siblings.

The results revealed that twins who had been divorced appeared nearly two years older than their siblings who were married, single or even widowed.

Antidepressant use was associated with a significantly older appearance and weight too was found to play a major factor. In those sets of twins who were less than 40 years old, the heavier twin was perceived as being older, while in those groups over 40 years old, the heavier twin appeared younger.

“The presence of stress could be one of the common denominators in those twins who appeared older,” commented Guyuron. Additionally, researchers thought that continued relaxation of the facial muscles owing to antidepressant use, could account for sagging.

“This research is important for two reasons,” said Guyuron. “First, we have discovered a number of new factors that contribute to aging and second, our findings put science behind the idea that volume replacement rejuvenates the face.”

www.aestheticmagazine.co.uk