Speaking of proportions, I thought this was quite topical…..…these images were produced by VisionMetric who develop the EFit software for police to illustrate how the same face can be manipulated to look both untrustworthy and trustworthy. Although the actual features have been manipulated, it does prove the point that when you mess around with that triangle of proportions, you can end up with a very different looking person. In saying that, some proportions do change with the ageing process, for example a man’s receding hairline can result in a larger looking forehead, and the loss of dentition as you get older can result in a smaller jaw.

Child Age Progression involves much structural change – it takes into consideration the underlying bone growth and the dentition changes which take place at around 6 -7 years old – these changes continue until at least 18 years of age.

Image produced by Karen T.Taylor, author of Forensic Art

You can see from this image drawn by Karen Taylor,  that the baby’s cranium is very large compared to the lower part of its skull. As a child develops the growth of the cranium then levels off and the lower part of the face, the nose, cheeks and jaw continue growing outwards and downwards.

Here are two well known faces who’ve been in the gossip columns recently, you can see how the area below their eyes has grown in comparison to the eyes and above. There has been some research to show that beautiful people have proportions closer to those of a child i.e. larger foreheads, small noses and chins, big eyes.

I spoke before about a unique look, usually you find that there is a consistency of appearance throughout life – like when you meet old friends at school reunions – it’s amazing how people just don’t change – it’s more true for some than others but there are always the extreme exceptions.

www.changemyface.com

Auriole Prince BA MAA RMIP

Last week I was honoured to be asked to talk to the Medical Artists’ Association www.maa.org.uk at the Royal College of Surgeons. Here is a summary part 1. of the Art of Age Progression….

I found this definition of ageing on wikipedia……Ageing is the accumulation of changes in an organism or object over time. Aging in humans refers to a multidimensional process of physical, psychological, and social change. Some dimensions of aging grow and expand over time, while others decline.

I studied illustration and photography at Maidstone Art college and after a few years, joined the Missing People Charity where I learnt all the different skills to become a forensic artist. This included training at the FBI Academy in Quantico in 2D and 3D facial reconstruction  – witness interviewing and E-Fit training at Durham with the British Police, Age Progression training at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Washington. And last but not least – the Medical Art Post graduate course.

Here are some of the images I produced – I tried to incorporate the forensic art into my Medical Art course as this was my line of work at the time. From 1997 to 2004 I worked for the Missing People Charity – I started as a volunteer then moved into case work, looking after the families of those who had gone missing. I then moved into the Identification department and started to learn forensic art, which included child age progression for long term missing children, facial reconstruction from skeletal remains, sanitizing photos of people found dead and updating photos of missing adults, i.e. changing hairstyles etc I also helped police to match missing persons reports with those found unidentified, dead or alive.

Age progressions are normally done for three reasons……

Firstly and most importantly, they are used when someone has been missing for two or more years and there has been sufficient time for appearances to change. The age progression image normally renews publicity and media interest in a case, therefore the case stays pro-active, supporting families and hopefully finding the person safe.

Secondly, age progressions are produced by or for police to try to capture criminals.

Thirdly, age progressions are often used in the media to illustrate to people the damaging effects of for example, smoking, drinking and sunbathing as a kind of a shock tactic.

Missing Person April Fabb

This is the case of missing person April Fabb – she was 13 when she disappeared on her bicycle in Norfolk, never to be seen again. She would now be in her mid 50’s.

Here I started off with a reference photograph in colour of a lady in her 50’s. I then used that as my main reference photo. I had pictures of her parents in their 50’s and used those as reference, Each age progression is different, and sometimes I’ll merge the missing photo with that of a family member. It just depends on what I have to work with.

Effectively, you are piecing together a puzzle using reference pictures of family members – here lie the clues as to how someone is going to look when they are older. Ultimately, I’m always hopeful that I’ll maintain the proportions and ‘unique look’ of that person.

Part 2 continues later…..

www.changemyface.com

www.missingpeople.org.uk