Speaking of proportions, I thought this was quite topical…..…these images were produced by VisionMetric who develop the EFit software for police to illustrate how the same face can be manipulated to look both untrustworthy and trustworthy. Although the actual features have been manipulated, it does prove the point that when you mess around with that triangle of proportions, you can end up with a very different looking person. In saying that, some proportions do change with the ageing process, for example a man’s receding hairline can result in a larger looking forehead, and the loss of dentition as you get older can result in a smaller jaw.

Child Age Progression involves much structural change – it takes into consideration the underlying bone growth and the dentition changes which take place at around 6 -7 years old – these changes continue until at least 18 years of age.

Image produced by Karen T.Taylor, author of Forensic Art

You can see from this image drawn by Karen Taylor,  that the baby’s cranium is very large compared to the lower part of its skull. As a child develops the growth of the cranium then levels off and the lower part of the face, the nose, cheeks and jaw continue growing outwards and downwards.

Here are two well known faces who’ve been in the gossip columns recently, you can see how the area below their eyes has grown in comparison to the eyes and above. There has been some research to show that beautiful people have proportions closer to those of a child i.e. larger foreheads, small noses and chins, big eyes.

I spoke before about a unique look, usually you find that there is a consistency of appearance throughout life – like when you meet old friends at school reunions – it’s amazing how people just don’t change – it’s more true for some than others but there are always the extreme exceptions.

www.changemyface.com

Auriole Prince BA MAA RMIP

Last week I was honoured to be asked to talk to the Medical Artists’ Association www.maa.org.uk at the Royal College of Surgeons. Here is a summary part 1. of the Art of Age Progression….

I found this definition of ageing on wikipedia……Ageing is the accumulation of changes in an organism or object over time. Aging in humans refers to a multidimensional process of physical, psychological, and social change. Some dimensions of aging grow and expand over time, while others decline.

I studied illustration and photography at Maidstone Art college and after a few years, joined the Missing People Charity where I learnt all the different skills to become a forensic artist. This included training at the FBI Academy in Quantico in 2D and 3D facial reconstruction  – witness interviewing and E-Fit training at Durham with the British Police, Age Progression training at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Washington. And last but not least – the Medical Art Post graduate course.

Here are some of the images I produced – I tried to incorporate the forensic art into my Medical Art course as this was my line of work at the time. From 1997 to 2004 I worked for the Missing People Charity – I started as a volunteer then moved into case work, looking after the families of those who had gone missing. I then moved into the Identification department and started to learn forensic art, which included child age progression for long term missing children, facial reconstruction from skeletal remains, sanitizing photos of people found dead and updating photos of missing adults, i.e. changing hairstyles etc I also helped police to match missing persons reports with those found unidentified, dead or alive.

Age progressions are normally done for three reasons……

Firstly and most importantly, they are used when someone has been missing for two or more years and there has been sufficient time for appearances to change. The age progression image normally renews publicity and media interest in a case, therefore the case stays pro-active, supporting families and hopefully finding the person safe.

Secondly, age progressions are produced by or for police to try to capture criminals.

Thirdly, age progressions are often used in the media to illustrate to people the damaging effects of for example, smoking, drinking and sunbathing as a kind of a shock tactic.

Missing Person April Fabb

This is the case of missing person April Fabb – she was 13 when she disappeared on her bicycle in Norfolk, never to be seen again. She would now be in her mid 50’s.

Here I started off with a reference photograph in colour of a lady in her 50’s. I then used that as my main reference photo. I had pictures of her parents in their 50’s and used those as reference, Each age progression is different, and sometimes I’ll merge the missing photo with that of a family member. It just depends on what I have to work with.

Effectively, you are piecing together a puzzle using reference pictures of family members – here lie the clues as to how someone is going to look when they are older. Ultimately, I’m always hopeful that I’ll maintain the proportions and ‘unique look’ of that person.

Part 2 continues later…..

www.changemyface.com

www.missingpeople.org.uk

How Leslie may have looked without the trout pout….I think she would have aged very beautifully. This is Leslie as she is now and below, my age progression image showing how she may have looked without any cosmetic intervention….however, we need to take into account her illness and stress – all these contribute to the ageing process. This was commissioned by Closer magazine. You can see how you would look with enhanced lips at www.changemyface.com

Leslie Ash shopping Kings Rd

700403sw

www.changemyface.com

An image has been created of Anne Frank to show how she would look on her 80th birthday. I feel the image is not entirely up to date – she looks like an elderly woman from the 1950’s. However, to be fair, the image is sympathetically constructed…

anne frank

The ‘age progression’ image shows the diarist as she might have appeared today had she not died of typhus and starvation at the age of 15 in Bergen Belsen in March 1945, just a few weeks before the Nazi concentration camp was liberated by British troops.

Created for the Anne Frank Trust UK to mark her birthday on Friday – using the same techniques developed to artificially age missing people such as toddler Madeleine McCann – it is hoped the picture will help inspire Britain’s school children to think about the kind of lives they would like to lead, and to remember the loss of six million people in the Holocaust.

The Trust will launch a competition for children to write a letter to their 80-year-old selves, one of a number of projects being run across the world to mark the anniversary and challenge racist attitudes.

Anne’s half-sister Eva Schloss, a survivor of Auschwitz who played with her as a child in Amsterdam, saw the aged image for the first time on Thursday.

“I must say I was a bit shocked… I don’t really know why,” she said.

“It is a beautiful lady, very gentle, very kind-looking with this gentle smile.”

The aged image was produced by a Michigan firm called Phojoe which has worked with US police on dozens of missing persons cases.

The firm describes the technique as “part art, part science and a little intuition”, and bases its aged image on whatever photographs are available – which in Anne Franks’ case were of a carefree young girl.

Dr Schloss believes the loss of her mother and sister and Anne’s experiences in Auschwitz and then Bergen Belsen would have left their mark if she had lived, however.

“Personally I think she would have been more bitter and disappointed. I don’t see anything of this in the picture.”

Anne’s diary, which was first published in Dutch in 1947 and has since been translated into more than 60 different languages, details her time hiding from the Nazis with her Jewish family in Amsterdam.

Link to Telegraph article

changemyface – age progression, cosmetic surgery imaging and slimmer imaging

We found this news in Aesthetic Medicine Magazine highlighting the dangers of sunbathing as we start to see better weather. Last year changemyface created an shocking image of the singer Sandi Thom to show how she would look as she aged using sunbeds – and also without. The difference is quite astonishing.

sandi-thon-age-progression-comparison-logo-ss

Skin cancer rises among young women 08 Apr 2009 Skin cancer is now the most common form of cancer for women in their 20s. Cancer Research UK, which launched its SunSmart campaign today, released figures that show that a woman within this age range is diagnosed with malignant melanoma almost every day. It has also risen to become the third most common cancer among women in their 30s, after breast and cervical cancers. Cancer Research puts the blame for the rise on an increasing use of sunbeds and “binge tanning” on overseas holidays. However, as well as advising the public to avoid such excessive exposure to UV, the charity’s campaign will emphasise the benefits of regularly using high SPFs in skincare – to protect against both melanoma and skin ageing. “Excessive exposure to UV damages the DNA in skin cells which increases the risk of skin cancer and makes skin age faster,” said Caroline Cerny, Cancer Research UK’s SunSmart campaign manager.

www.cancerresearchuk.org

www.changemyface.com

Check out ‘The Truth About Beauty’ tomorrow evening where we show Dancing on Ice’s Coleen Nolan how she will look in the future according to her lifestyle – it’s not all together a pretty sight as Coleen is still on 20 cigs a day which is not good for the looks. We also show you how she would look if she had her teeth done and if she had a facelift. Keep watching as we’ll post the results soon! Watch ‘The Truth About Beauty’ on ITV 1 on Thursday at 9pm.

coleen-now-s1

www.changemyface.com

I am fast approaching 40 and wondering – what makes us age, why does it happen and can we slow the ageing process down? It seems every morning,  I wake up to a new wrinkle and a few more grey hairs and my thoughts turn to getting old and dying…..Auriole Prince found this article which explains what happens in our bodies to make us age and what we can do to slow the process down…

lucy-age-progressions1

Lucy was age progressed by changemyface to reflect her unhealthy lifestyle.

www.changemyface.com

Why we age

Ageing is the result of a build-up of damage in our bodies’ cells

Ageing is the result of a build-up of damage in our bodies’ cells. It takes a long time for the damage to get to a level where it may harm us, but eventually we can no longer overlook it.

The protein fibres keeping our skin and artery walls elastic go through changes that lead to loss of that vital flexibility. The DNA strands inside our cells get damaged, too. Ultimately, the cells’ energy production systems fail.

An important type of damage is oxidisation, the result of attacks by free radicals. Oxidisation rusts metal, makes fat go rancid and causes browning of peeled fruits and vegetables. It also helps to make us age.

Our bodies have evolved powerful antioxidant enzymes to guard cells against free radicals, but these defences aren’t 100 per cent.

Role of genes

Longevity tends to run in families. The genes influencing the ageing process seem to be those that influence how well the body maintains and repairs its cells.

The risk of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s also appears also to have a genetic component.

Lifestyle factors

We can control some aspects of the process

Ageing isn’t all down to our genes. We can control some aspects of the process.

The lifestyle choices we make are important. We can eat food that burdens our bodies with saturated fats, for example, or we can eat food that’s high in natural antioxidants to aid the body’s defences.

We can exercise so our natural systems for renewal and repair keep our muscles, lungs and blood circulatory system in good shape, and we can stretch our minds to reinforce the networks of connection between brain cells.

Uncertain future

We know ageing catches up with all of us in the end, but we don’t know exactly what lies in store.

Some people keep their mental faculties intact until they’re 100, while others can get dementia in their 50s. Some people retain their mobility, but others with conditions such as arthritis find it more difficult.

This article was last medically reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks in July 2007.
First published in March 2000. www.bbc.co.uk/health

Changemyface used its specialised age progression imaging skills to show how 10 children will look in 30 years time according to statistical data on obesity. The problem of obesity is growing at such an alarming rate the National Health system could be bankrupted as a result by 2030.

holly-age-progression-comparison-f

This is Holly – one of 10 children age progressed 30 years – statistically 6 out of 10 will be overweight, 3 will be clinically obese and only 1 will be a healthy normal size.

group-portrait-comparison-s

www.changemyface.com

SHE MAGAZINE

How will 3 women with different lifestyles look in 20 years time – depending on their lifestyles – very differently! You can see the whole article in November’s issue of SHE.



Marilyn Monroe at 80

October 25, 2008

This was commisioned for the Independent Newspaper in 2007